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A Moveable Feast



Jennet Ingle

What's Going on?

Ernest Hemingway famously said,” If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.”
That statement is so fantastically romantic,  and his entire era of expatriates boozing around in the City of Lights so exciting and compelling, that I simply had to capitalize on it.

Here, finally, is the program I've been looking forward to all year.  In this travelogue performance, we’re presenting delicious music representing Tunisia, Naples, Peru, Cambodia, Nigeria, Scotland, and other exotic locales.  Paul Hamilton and I will play some great works by Pasculli, Ibert, Tomasi, and Ewazen.

I have always loved the popular music of the 30s and 40s, and am delighted to collaborate with cabaret artist Justin Hayford.  We’ll do a set of location-based songs from the American Popular Songbook.   Although we have worked together before (I’m on the title track of THIS album!), this will be our first LIVE performance together.

There will be cookies at the conclusion of this recital!


Where and When?


A Moveable Feast
Jennet Ingle, oboe
Paul Hamilton, piano
Justin Hayford, cabaret artist

Thursday, March 22, 2012, at 7:30pm
LakeView Lutheran Church
835 W. Addison, Chicago
Tickets $12/8 students and seniors

Saturday, March 24, 2012, at 3:00pm EST
South Bend Christian Reformed Church
1855 N. Hickory, South Bend
Tickets $10/5

Tickets for both are available at the door, or at a discounted rate in advance from my website, www.jennetingle.com.


Where Else Can I Read About You?

I am on the web at jennetingle.com, and I blog about my adventures at ProneOboe.  If you are not on my email list, please do join it HERE - I will not send spam but I will keep you well informed about my upcoming performances.

What Else is Going On?


I will be performing my CHROMA program, with Paul Hamilton as pianist and videographer, on:
Sunday, April 29th at 3:00, at Delaware County Community College outside Philadelphia.

I will be playing Doug Lofstrom’s Concertino for Oboe at the International Double Reed Society Conference in Oxford, OH on July 9 at 4:45pm.  This lovely piece was commissioned for me in 2006 and I premiered it in 2007 with the New Philharmonic Orchestra. 

I am giving a noontime recital at the Chicago Cultural Center on July 23rd, 2012.  I have no idea what will be on it, yet.  But we'll have fun.

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