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Fall Newsletter

All the stuff going on this season...

Jennet Ingle

 

Welcome to Fall 2012!


Hello, Newsletter Readers!  I found myself sitting at my computer planning updates for those who like hearing me perform, to those who like my reeds, and to those who take lessons from me - and decided to replan one nice big update for everyone who is the slightest bit interested.

Incidentally, if you are reading this and it did NOT arrive conveniently in your inbox, from me, and you would like to periodically (every couple of months, totally unspammily) receive something like it, please click HERE and add your email to my mailing list.  Once you are on it you will never be forgotten, which I cannot otherwise promise.  Sign your oboe-loving friends up, too!

Everything is in development and everything is in motion.

Quintet Performance October 18

I am looking forward to a full recital with the South Bend Symphony’s Wind Quintet.  We’ll be at the Snite Museum of Art on Notre Dame’s campus, at 5:45 pm on Thursday, October 18.  The group will perform gems from the quintet repertoire, with a focus on the music of France.

The Symphony Quintet is one of my very favorite things about my position here in the SBSO.  We have a wonderful, intimate musical interaction, fun repertoire, and a strong personal connection as well.  Most of the shows we do are educational in nature, but somehow they never get boring with this group. 

I can hardly wait to rehearse and perform an hour-long program of legitimate rep!  For details click HERE.

And More Performances

Looking ahead to the spring, I will be giving a joint recital with the lovely and talented flutist Dr. Martha Councell-Vargas from Western Michigan University.  Martha and I have been friends for a long time and are thrilled to be collaborating this year. We’ll do a program of works by female composers, and mostly living ones at that.  Performances will take place at WMU and at Valparaiso University in late February.  All details will be on my website as they become available.

I have another program in my mind - a mixed chamber music performance which I’d love to do in an intimate venue here in South Bend.  This program is purely speculative at this point, but rest assured that when it happens you will hear about it.

Jennet Ingle Reeds

is in the midst of a Back-to-School Sale!  I am offering 10-15% off all finished reeds through September 30.  In case that doesn’t keep me busy enough, I have also introduced English horn and oboe d’amore Blanks and Sort-Of-Scraped Reeds.  By next month I plan to add processed cane to my offerings - keep an eye on that website!

Barret Night!

At the end of this month my private students will meet as a group for the first time in a performance masterclass called Barret Night.  Each will play a few etudes for assembled family, friends, and oboists, with the goal of increased comfort in public performance.  We’ll compare notes and award prizes, then play some more and eat cookies.

This event is specifically designed to get us over the hump of walking out in front of an audience, speaking, and performing.  It's a skill that can transfer to all areas of life -  think of teachers lecturing, businesspeople addressing meetings, secretaries having to lead the office in a chorus of “Happy Birthday - and is obviously crucial for a musician.

In addition, when we learn etudes and studies only well enough to get by in lessons, we miss that magical last step - the step in which we turn an assignment into a piece of music.  Only real performance practice does that, and if ISSMA Solo and Ensemble is the only time that a student performs in the year, he or she won’t improve very fast.

I've done this class before, but not in several years.  I hope to have mini-recitals and oboe studio events much more frequently this season. We will have fun!

Copyright © 2012 Jennet Ingle, All rights reserved.
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