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Oboe Reed Get Togethers

Reed making is a highly personal experience.  You strive to make the reed that makes your own instrument sing, and through playing on your reeds you learn how to make what you need to play your reeds.  Although I can play perfectly well on another person’s reed, and I certainly make plenty of reeds for others, it’s inherently a solo project.  You make them alone, you play on them alone, and sometimes, alone, you can get a little crazy.

But the craft itself doesn’t require solitude.  In fact, some of my most positive experiences have involved other people.  Someone else’s ear or opinion on the sound you are making, someone else’s proposed technique to solve a problem - you can learn a TON from each other, and obviously enjoy a great social experience at the same time.

I’ve taught and participated in many reed classes, and had many great one-on-one reed sessions with colleagues.  Sometimes I have information or techniques that help the other people, sometimes they provide an AHA moment for me - but inevitably we get good reeds made, and have a friendly and uplifting time.  

I’ll soon open registration for my summer Oboe Reed Boot Camp, which is 12 hours of small-group fun and productivity in June and again in July.  


But for NOW, may I point out to you the pleasure and productivity of my Oboe Reed Get Togethers!  I’m offering them monthly, every month that I don’t have a Boot Camp.  Everyone is welcome, from professionals wanting a little company to amateurs wanting a little help to students wanting to get started. We can all benefit from a little feedback, or a full on reed lesson!  I have tools available for use on site - knives, plaques, mandrels, shaper tips, etc - and cane and tubes available to purchase if you haven’t brought your own.  All of my thread colors are on the table.

Admission is free to my current students and to last summer’s Boot Camp participants, and $15 to everyone else.  AND I have some coming up tomorrow and Tuesday.  And more in May.  Details HERE.

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